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Moving on

Recovery can sometimes take quite some time, although everyone is different. It is fair to say that we probably know the least about longer term recovery. This is largely because the current research recommendations are to follow patients up for "at least 6 months" after Intensive Care. Also, much of the research that has been done has tended to use questionnaires which, although very useful, may not tell us enough about what recovery is like for patients in their everyday lives.

Having spoken to a number of patients at one year after hospital discharge, however, it seems that while some may have lingering physical and psychological issues after being in Intensive Care, many have learned to live with them. The main focus at this time would appear to be keeping well, maintaining a healthy lifestyle and getting out and about. For some, the "anniversary" of their time in Intensive Care can prompt them to reflect on their emotional journey. In this section, we've provided some links to general information and advice. We hope you find it useful.

 

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Web Link: Covid-19: The Road to Recovery

There is much we are still learning about Covid-19 and one thing we know for certain is that the road to recovery isn’t always straightforward. Don’t feel worried or discouraged if it takes a while to get your energy and fitness back. The following advice is designed to help you on your road to recovery.

Web Link: Critical Care Recovery Book Club

Welcome to the Critcal Care Recovery Book Club! All of the books within this blog have been recommended by either individuals who have been in your position or by those that have benefitted from reading or listening these particular books. We hope that you can benefit from reading/listening to them too. And please feel free to comment your own thoughts below each post if you have read/listened to the book. If you would like to review a book for the book club please email...

Web Link: Disability Snowsport UK

This link will take you to the Disability Snowsport UK Homepage, which has links to local groups. Disability Snowsport UK is a people-centred organisation with a unique sense of purpose: that anyone regardless of their disability can take part in and enjoy the thrill of snowsports. They are a membership organisation, and welcome anyone of any levels of skiing and fitness. They cater for complete novices to snowsports all the way to elite athletes.

Web Link: Driving

Even if you didn't previously have a medical condition or disability that affected your ability to drive, a number of common Intensive Care related issues may affect your confidence or ability to drive. These include ongoing weakness in the arms and legs, poor concentration or visual impairments.You may have new medications which might affect your ability to drive.Speak to your GP or check with the DVLA if you're not sure whether you should be driving. This link will take you to...

Web Link: Eating Disorders and Coronavirus

Text from site: Coronavirus is understandably causing a lot of stress and anxiety, and we know that things may feel very uncertain right now. If you have an eating disorder, or are supporting someone who does, you might have specific worries or practical concerns to do with the illness or treatment. We’ve listened to the issues you’ve raised and, with the help of eating disorder clinicians, put together the guidance below to try to respond to the most common ones. Carers can...

Web Link: Exercises lying on your bed

A short guide on exercises you can do whilst lying in your bed to help progress your recovery.

Web Link: Exercises whilst sitting

Exercises you can do whilst sitting during your recovery.

Web Link: FAQs on COVID-19 and Addiction / Substance Use Disorder

The COVID-19 pandemic presents unique challenges for people with substance use disorders and in recovery. The following resources may help.

External Video: Fatigue (tiredness): how "pacing" can help

Video length: 06:32 (Watch now or tap the button above to add this resource to your personal library to watch later) This short clip will explain how the technique of pacing may be used to manage any fatigue (tiredness) that you may be experiencing.

Web Link: Free Guide To Critical Illness, Intensive Care, And Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

As a result of the current global health crisis, many more people than usual are having serious medical experiences. These include admissions to hospital with breathing difficulties, or transfers to critical care (intensive care) units. A significant proportion of these people will go on to develop symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).