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Families' page

Getting your loved one home can be an enormous relief, but it can also raise a number of questions about how much help they might need, how able you feel to support them physically and emotionally, what kind of help you might be able to get for yourself, how long they might take to make a full recovery and how you might cope financially if you need to take time off work. In this section, we have provided some practical information, advice and links to potential sources of help with everyday living, money and emotional support.

 

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Web Link: Attendance Allowance

Attendance Allowance is a benefit for people aged 65 or over who need help with personal care (washing,dressing or eating, for example).Some patients need this type of help in the first few weeks and months after they get home.This link will take you to the NHS Choices web page, which will tell you more about what this allowance is, who is eligible and how to claim it.

External Video: Bob describes his long term recovery

In this short video, Bob (a former Intensive Care patient) talks about his recovery over the months and years since his accident. Video length: 06:53 (Watch now or tap the button to add this resource to your personal library)

Web Link: Borrowing a wheelchair

Although you may not have been issued with a wheelchair when you leave hospital, some people continue to have problems with walking after they get home.It might be helpful to borrow a wheelchair "just to get out of the house", if you're not sure how far you can walk, you tire easily or have lost your confidence a little. This link will take you to the webpage of the British Red Cross, who may be able to lend you mobility equipment.If you type in your postcode, they can...

Web Link: Carers' Assessment (NHS Choices)

When someone ends up Intensive Care, close family and friends are also affected. They play a very important part in the patients' recovery after they go home.Given the importance of their involvement, the government has ensured that they have certain rights that, by law, must be met. Close family or close friends are often called "carers" by health and social care services, and most have a legal right to an assessment of their own needs. That includes things like...

External Video: Common issues after getting home

Video length: 22:30 (Watch now or tap the button above to add this resource to your personal library to watch later) In this video, Anne talks about her role as a follow up nurse at Ninewells Hospital in Dundee. She sees patients after they've been discharged from hospital and talks about the common issues patients and families face during this time.

Web Link: ICU Support Groups

Some people find it really helpful to talk with others who have been through similar experiences to their own. This is the weblink to ICUsteps website with details of support groups for patient and families across the UK. It will tell you more about the groups, who they are, what they do and when the meetings are held. Several groups across the country (eg Chester, Edinburgh & Brighton) are currently offering online or "virtual" support group meetings which you can join...

Web Link: Psychological support for older people & families

This link will take you to the MindEd website, and their mental health resources to help support older people, and those who care for them. There are some easily understandable advice and self-help resources on dealing with issues like anxiety and depression (including information on medication), poor sleep, loneliness, stress, physical activity, etc.

Web Link: Support services for carers

This link will take you to the website of the Carers' Trust. They offer online information and advice on a whole range of issues, including respite care and looking after yourself. They have a "help directory" of local support and a lively forum and chat room where you can talk online to other carers.