We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue to use this site we will assume that you are happy with it. Privacy Policy

OK


The hospital wards

The COVID-19 outbreak has affected UK hospitals in many different ways.Some Units have been quieter, and have been able to keep their patients in Intensive Care as long as they normally would. Others will have been exceptionally busy, and may have had no option but to transfer their most recovered patients to the hospital wards a little more quickly than normal. The wards will also vary greatly in terms of how much rehabilitation and follow-up they are able to offer. 

In this section, we've provided some general information and advice on common physical and psychological issues issues during the ward stage of recovery, the types of staff involved in your care (who they are and what they do) and what to expect in terms of getting you home. We've also included sections on other people's experiences and frequently asked questions. We hope you find it helpful.

 

You have 74 results.

Apply a filter below to refine your search results.

Web Link: ACAS Employment Advice Website

Worried about your employment rights after a stay in the ICU and during your recovery? The ACAS website is easy to navigate, full of information and will give you the lowdown on your rights as an employee.

External Video: Bob describes his experience on the ward

In this video clip, Bob (a former Intensive Care patient) talks about his recovery on the general wards, after being transferred out of Intensive Care.

Article: Breathlessness

Is it common to feel breathless after Intensive Care? Breathlessness is common after Intensive Care. It is particularly common after COVID-19. Why do I feel breathless? COVID-19 is a respiratory virus, which means that it affects your breathing.Spending time on a ventilator in Intensive Care may also have caused weakness in your muscles, including those that help you breathe, so they are a bit weaker and you have to work a bit harder with breathing. You can quickly lose your ability...

External Video: Breathlessness: how "pacing" can help

This short clip will explain how a technique known as "pacing" may help feelings of breathlessness. You might also find the booklets on bodily positions to help breathlessness, breathing control and how to conserve your energy helpful in dealing with breathlessness.

Web Link: Breathlessness: positions that help

This link will take you to Lancashire Teaching Hospitals' excellent online resource on recovery after COVID-19. This section includes short videos from healthcare professionals on breathing control, and positions that may help with breathlessness. You can access the full resource here

Document: Breathlessness-breathing exercises

This booklet outlines some of the breathing techniques that can be used to help breathlessness. Try out the different approaches. Controlled breathing can be particularly useful if you are feeling very breathless.

Web Link: Carers Allowance factsheet

This link will take you to the Carers UK website.There is a really useful, recently updated factsheet about carers' allowance that you can read or print off.

Document: Confusion (delirium) and Intensive Care

This is a short, easy to read booklet written by ICUSteps.It explains what delirium is, why patients in Intensive Care are often confused, what it feels like for the patient and the things family members can do to help.Some patients continue to be a little confused after they are transferred to the general wards, although this is usually temporary.

Article: Confusion, paranoia or behaving out of character

Is it common to have been confused, paranoid or to have behaved out of character? Yes, it is very common.Just as these things are very common in Intensive Care, patients often experience these symptoms in the first few days following transfer to the ward. You may have felt very confused (not quite knowing where you are or why), you may have felt that others were out to harm you (paranoia) or may have behaved completely out of character by perhaps being a little unreasonable,...

Article: Coping with transfer to the ward

It's not always easy or even possible to prepare patients for transfer out of Intensive Care and onto the general wards.Intensive Care beds are in great demand and it's often impossible to predict when a bed might be needed for someone else.Although we try to avoid it as best we can, this sometimes means that patients are transferred out with little warning. From one to one care to "one of many" Patients often tell us that transfer to the wards can be a bit of...