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External Video: Pacing for Pain

Video length: 04:30 (Watch now or tap the button above to add this resource to your personal library to watch later) This short clip will explain how pacing your activities may help to manage any pain that you are experiencing.

Document: Pacing information booklet

This booklet about pacing has been written for people with ME or chronic fatigue. However the fatigue that you may be experiencing associated with being in Intensive Care can be managed with pacing in the same way. The booklet contains a wealth of information about the concept of pacing that you can apply to your 'post intensive care fatigue'. 

Web Link: Patient experiences of Physiotherapy on the wards

It's very common to have a degree of muscle wasting and general weakness after spending time in Intensive Care, sometimes resulting in por mobility. This is often more of an issue for people who were perhaps a little frail before ending up in Intensive Care, or those who spend longer in Intensive Care. Physiotherapy is a hugely important part of the recovery process.This link will take you to the Healthtalkonline website, and their page on other people's experiences of...

Article: Physiotherapy in Intensive Care

What do physiotherapists do in Intensive Care? Physiotherapy has a very important role in the care and treatment of patients in Intensive Care. There are two main things that the physiotherapist can help with; breathing and exercises. Help with breathing Many patients in Intensive Care need help with their breathing, even if they're not connected to a ventilator or breathing machine. Patients who are not connected to a ventilator or breathing machine may struggle to...

Article: Physiotherapy: what can family do to help on the ward?

Common problems after Intensive Care Patients are often immobile (lying still) for much of their time in Intensive Care, sometimes resulting in general stiffness or painful joints, especially in the knees and shoulders. They can also lose muscle as a result of being so ill, especially in the legs, which often results in general weakness and problems with mobility. This can mean that patients may become tired or short of breath when beginning to mobilise on the general ward. Not...